CROI 2016: Advances in Hepatitis C Research [VIDEO]

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Interferon-free therapy can now cure most patients with chronic hepatitis C, but challenges still remain, including persistent liver damage and cancer risk and HCV reinfection after successful treatment. A panel of hepatitis C experts discuss research presented at the recent Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2016) and related news with HIVandHepatitis.com editor Liz Highleyman in this IFARA video update.

 

[Liz Highleyman, Dost Sarpel, Kenneth Sherman, Jürgen Rockstroh --IFARA Hepatitis C Panel, CROI, February 24, 2016]

Jürgen Rockstroh from the University of Bonn reported that sofosbuvir/ledipasvir (Harvoni) taken for 6 weeks cured most people with acute infection and low viral load, but those with higher viral levels may need longer treatment.

Dost Sarpel from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai presented findings on risk factors for sofosbuvir/ledipasvir failure in a real-world clinical setting.

Kenneth Sherman from the University of Cincinnati discussed use of cenicriviroc -- a dual CCR2 and CCR5 antagonist -- to manage fibrosis in people with HIV.

This video is part of the Treatment Update series produced by the International Foundation for Alternative Research in AIDS (IFARA). Other CROI 2016 updates are available at accesshiv.org.

SEE ALSO: CROI 2016: Harvoni for 6 Weeks Cures HIV+ People with Acute HCV if Viral Load is Low

4/6/16

References

JK Rockstroh, S Bhagani, RH Hyland, et al. Ledipasvir/Sofosbuvir for 6 Weeks in HIV-Infected Patients With Acute HCV Infection. Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. Boston, February 22-25, 2016. Abstract 154LB.

E Abdel-Hameed, SD Rouster, and KE Sherman. Assessment of Hepatic Antifibrotic Effect of Cenicriviroc in Patients With HIV. Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. Boston, February 22-25, 2016. Abstract 552.

D Sarpel, A Harty, D Gardenier, et al. Ledipasvir/Sofosbuvir Failures in the Real World: What Patients Are at Risk? Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. Boston, February 22-25, 2016. Abstract 588