Back HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS Topics HIV Prevention

Scientists at the U.S. National Institutes of Health Discover Human Antibodies That Can Stop Most HIV Strains from Infecting Human Cells

Researchers have found 2 human antibodies that, in laboratory testing, halt the infection of more than 90 known strains of HIV, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This discovery could lead to more effective HIV vaccines and to improved strategies for the prevention and treatment of HIV infection.alt

Read more:

Global Experts Call for Better Match between HIV Prevention Efforts and Groups at Greatest Risk

Worldwide HIV/AIDS prevention efforts could be more successful if they did a better job of targeting resources toward groups at highest risk of infection, including men who have sex with men and injection drug users, according to a new report from the Global HIV Prevention Working Group released at the XVIII International AIDS Conference last week in Vienna.

Read more:

Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV Prevention Could Lead to Drug Resistance If Not Carefully Implemented

Widespread use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV pre-exposure prevention (PrEP) could lead to an increase in drug resistance if people are not screened to ensure they are really HIV negative before starting preventive therapy, according to presentations at the International Microbicides Conference (M2010) last month in Pittsburgh. Drug resistance expert John Mellors warned that using PrEP inappropriately might lead to a rapid increase in resistance to tenofovir and emtricitabine (the 2 drugs in the Truvada coformulation), making the most common first-line regimen less effective.

alt

Read more:

Antiretroviral Therapy Reduces Heterosexual HIV Transmission Risk by More than 90%

HIV positive people on antiretroviral therapy (ART) were 92% less likely than untreated individuals to transmit the virus to their heterosexual partners, according to an African study reported in the May 27, 2010 advance online edition of The Lancet. Among untreated partners, greater transmission risk was associated with lower CD4 cell count and higher viral load. The researchers concluded that ART could be an effective strategy for achieving population-level reductions in HIV transmission.

Read more:

How Well Do Needle Exchange Programs Work?

Needle and syringe programs have been widely adopted as a harm reduction measure to reduce the transmission of HIV, hepatitis B and C, and other blood-borne infections among injection drug users (IDUs). But evidence for the effectiveness of such interventions is "weaker than given credit for in the literature," and better-designed studies are needed, according to a review of reviews published in the May 2010 issue of Addiction. The authors of an accompanying editorial, however, argued that sterile syringe access "is certainly good enough" to recommend it as a key element in efforts to prevent infection among IDUs.

alt

 

Read more: