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Green Tea Compound in a Microbicide May Help Prevent HIV Entry into Cells

Since the start of the AIDS epidemic, researchers have sought women-controlled HIV prevention methods such as microbicide gels to reduce the risk of infection during sex. A wide variety of natural and manufactured chemicals have been tested as potential microbicides. Now, scientists report that a compound in green tea may help prevent HIV from attacking cells via semen.

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CDC Issues New Fact Sheet on Risk of Transmission of HIV and Other Sexually Transmitted Disease via Oral Sex

Since the earliest years of the AIDS epidemic, the issue of whether HIV can be transmitted through oral sex has been a subject of controversy.

While it is theoretical plausible that HIV may be transmitted via oral sex on a man or on a woman, and some studies show that such transmission rarely occurs, actual data remain scarce -- in part because most people do not engage in only a single type of sexual activity.

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FDA Approves New, Less Expensive Female Condom

While standard condoms are an effective way to prevent sexual transmission of HIV, researchers, advocates, and at-risk women have sought a prevention method that can be controlled by women. Last week, FHC announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a new second-generation female condom, dubbed FC2

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Circumcision Protects against Herpes and Human Papillomavirus in addition to HIV

In recent years, research has shown that adult male circumcision provides significant protection against HIV acquisition among heterosexual men in high-prevalence areas. A South African study reported in 2005 showed that elective circumcision reduced men's HIV infection rate by 61%. In late 2006, the National Institutes of Health halted 2 circumcision trials in Kenya and Uganda after interim analyses found that the procedure was associated with fewer new infections; final data from the studies showed that circumcision reduced the risk of HIV infection by 50%-60%.

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CROI 2009: Pre-exposure Prophylaxis Using Oral or Vaginal Tenofovir plus Emtricitabine Protects Monkeys from SIV Infection

Two studies presented at the 16th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2009) this week in Montreal showed that pre-exposure prophylaxis using tenofovir plus emtricitabine -- the 2 drugs in the Truvada fixed-dose combination pill -- protected monkeys from infection with a virus related to HIV. Researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) demonstrated that these drugs were highly effective in preventing simian immunodeficiency virus infection when administered either orally or in a vaginal microbicide gel.

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