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IAS 2009: Tenofovir/emtricitabine (Truvada) plus Lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra) or Raltegravir (Isentress) Work Well for Post-exposure Prophylaxis

Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) regimens consisting of tenofovir/emtricitabine (Truvada) plus lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra) or raltegravir (Isentress) prevent HIV infection as well as zidovudine/lamivudine (Combivir) regimens, but with fewer side effects, according to 2 presentations at the recent 5th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention (IAS 2009) in Cape Town, South Africa.

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Does Circumcision Lower the Risk of HIV Transmission for Gay and Bisexual Men?

Two recent studies produced contradictory answers to the question of whether circumcision might help prevent HIV transmission among men who have sex with men (MSM), as has been shown for heterosexual men in high prevalence countries. Conflicting data fuel the ongoing debate about whether public health officials should recommend routine circumcision for infants or at-risk adults.

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Green Tea Compound in a Microbicide May Help Prevent HIV Entry into Cells

Since the start of the AIDS epidemic, researchers have sought women-controlled HIV prevention methods such as microbicide gels to reduce the risk of infection during sex. A wide variety of natural and manufactured chemicals have been tested as potential microbicides. Now, scientists report that a compound in green tea may help prevent HIV from attacking cells via semen.

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House Democrats Propose Repeal of Funding Ban on Needle Exchange Programs

Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives proposed a change to a major appropriations bill that would end the long-standing ban on federal funding to supporting needle exchange programs, which have expanded rapidly in the past decade and are a proven effective strategy for preventing transmission of HIV and hepatitis B and C.

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CDC Issues New Fact Sheet on Risk of Transmission of HIV and Other Sexually Transmitted Disease via Oral Sex

Since the earliest years of the AIDS epidemic, the issue of whether HIV can be transmitted through oral sex has been a subject of controversy.

While it is theoretical plausible that HIV may be transmitted via oral sex on a man or on a woman, and some studies show that such transmission rarely occurs, actual data remain scarce -- in part because most people do not engage in only a single type of sexual activity.

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