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CROI 2014: Dapivirine Vaginal Ring Appears Safe and Effective in Tissue Study

Vaginal rings containing the experimental NNRTI dapivirine were well-tolerated and blocked HIV infection of cervical tissue samples, but rings containing maraviroc did not produce adequate drug concentrations, researchers reported at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) this month in Boston.

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CROI 2014: Efavirenz Matches Lopinavir/ritonavir for Perinatal HIV Treatment

Pregnant women taking efavirenz-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) had significantly better virological outcomes at the time of delivery compared to those taking lopinavir/ ritonavir in a randomized study in rural Uganda, according to a report at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) in Boston this month.

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CROI 2014: Nipping HIV in the Bud -- Could We Use Genotyping to Interrupt Transmission?

The 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) this month in Boston heard a number of presentations on phylogenetic analysis -- the use of genetic fingerprinting of HIV to trace patterns of transmission and prioritize groups for targeting prevention.

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CROI 2014: Lopinavir or Lamivudine Equally Protective Against HIV During Breast-feeding

Peri-exposure prophylaxis using either lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra) or lamivudine (3TC, Epivir) proved equally protective as infant prophylaxis against HIV infection during 12 months of breast-feeding, according to a report at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) this month in Boston.

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CDC Reports Probable Case of HIV Transmission Linked to Lesbian Sex

A woman in Texas who reported no other risk factors appears to have contracted HIV through sex with a female partner who was not on antiretroviral therapy, according to a report in the March 14, 2014, edition of the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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CROI 2014: People with HIV More Likely to Die of Many Common Cancers

People with HIV are more likely to die from many common cancers than the rest of the U.S. population, according to a large comparative study presented at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) this month in Boston.

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CROI 2014: Disparities in Viral Suppression in Washington, DC [VIDEO]

A majority of people with HIV in Washington, DC, were able to achieve and maintain undetectable HIV viral load on antiretroviral therapy, but disparities in viral suppression exist with regard to race, sex, social, and economic factors, researchers reported at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) last week in Boston.

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