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IAS 2015: PrEP Adherence, Sexual Behavior, and HIV and STI Incidence [VIDEO]

An open-label Truvada pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) demonstration project, which included more than 500 mostly gay and bisexual men in San Francisco, Miami, and Washington, DC, showed that adherence was generally good overall -- especially among people at highest risk for HIV infection -- but there were some important disparities, researchers reported at the recent 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention in Vancouver.

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Tenofovir Alafenamide Combo Pill Matches Truvada for HIV Efficacy, but Easier on Bones and Kidneys

A fixed-dose combination pill containing tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) worked as well in a Phase 3 trial as the current Truvada pill containing the older tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) -- which is used for both HIV treatment and pre-exposure prophylaxis or PrEP -- but causes less kidney and bone toxicity, according to an announcement this week from Gilead Sciences.

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IAS 2015: First Brazilian Data Reinforce Evidence that PrEP is Mostly Used by Those at Greatest Risk

The first data from a Brazilian open-label demonstration project of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) show, in common with several other studies presented at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention last month in Vancouver, that the higher a person’s risk of HIV infection, the more likely they are to seek and use PrEP.

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No New HIV Infections Seen Over 2.5 Years in Kaiser San Francisco PrEP Program

The number of people accessing Truvada pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) through the large Kaiser Permanente San Francisco healthcare system has increased dramatically since 2012, and no new HIV infections have been reported so far, according to study results published in the September 1 advance edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases. Rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) were high -- reaching 50% after a year on PrEP -- and some gay men reported a drop-off in condom use, but PrEP offers an opportunity for timely STI diagnosis and treatment, the researchers said.

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IAS 2015: Innovative Linkage to Care Approaches Boost Clinic Visits, HIV Treatment Uptake in African Study

A systematic effort to promote HIV testing, linkage to care for people diagnosed with HIV, and circumcision for those testing negative can result in high levels of diagnosis, linkage to care, and viral suppression in rural communities, a randomized study of combination HIV prevention conducted in South Africa and Uganda has shown. The findings were presented by Ruanne Barnabas of the University of Washington Department of Global Health at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention last month in Vancouver.

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IAS 2015: Peer or Community Interventions Improve Outcomes for Mothers with HIV

Peer- and community-based interventions can significantly increase retention in care of mothers with HIV and improve attendance at early prenatal clinic visits, according to results from 2 large multi-country studies presented last month at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2015) in Vancouver.

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IAS 2015: HIV Self-Testing May Help "Hard to Reach" Learn Their Status, but Uncertainties Remain

HIV self-testing (or home testing) is likely to have an important place in future global HIV strategies, but at the moment there are significant gaps in the evidence base of how it may best be made available, to which populations, and with what kind of support. So while the World Health Organization (WHO) has clearly signaled its enthusiasm for the approach, its new guidance on HIV testing, launched at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention last month in Vancouver, reviews what we know so far about self-testing but does not actually recommend it. Several self-testing studies were also presented at the conference.

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IAS 2015: HIV+ People with Asymptomatic Cognitive Impairment More Likely to Develop Symptoms

People with HIV who showed evidence of asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment at study entry were nearly twice as likely to progress to symptomatic HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders than those with initially normal neuropsychological tests, according to research presented at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention last month in Vancouver.

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IAS 2015: Ryan and Julie Lewis -- The 30/30 Project [VIDEO]

Musician Ryan Lewis and his mother Julie Lewis spoke at the opening session of the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention last month in Vancouver, describing their 30/30 Project to fund health facilities worldwide.

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IAS 2015: Estrogen May Block HIV Reactivation, Hints at Gender Differences in Viral Reservoirs

Estrogen receptors on cells may play a role in HIV latency and reactivation, and drugs targeting these receptors could potentially be used to either promote reactivation of integrated viral genes or keep them silent, according to research presented at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention and at the preceding IAS Towards an HIV Cure Symposium last month in Vancouver.

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Updated Guidelines for Pregnant Women with HIV and Preventing Mother-to-Child Transmission

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services last week released an update to its Recommendations for Use of Antiretroviral Drugs in Pregnant HIV-1-Infected Women for Maternal Health and Interventions to Reduce Perinatal HIV Transmission in the United States. Notable changes include discussion of antiretroviral treatment as prevention and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for serodiscordant couples wishing to conceive, and a new section on options for perinatally infected women who are now pregnant themselves.

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IAS 2015: ADAPT Study Shows PrEP Feasibility [VIDEO]

Results from the HPTN 067 or ADAPT trial -- a study of Truvada (tenofovir/emtricitabine) pre-exposure prophylaxis for gay men in New York City and Bangkok, and heterosexual women in Cape Town -- add to the growing body of evidence about how best to use PrEP and how its protective effect may vary across population groups and with different dosing schedules, researchers reported at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention last month in Vancouver.

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IAS 2015: High Adherence and No HIV Infections Seen in Heterosexual PrEP Study in Botswana

A study of open-label Truvada HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) among heterosexual people in Botswana found very high adherence rates. Around 90% of participants had useful levels of the drug in their blood, there was a high concordance between self-reported adherence and drug levels, and there were no HIV infections, according to a presentation at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention last month in Vancouver.

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IAS 2015: Information about HIV Treatment as Prevention Lessens Stigma and Increases Testing

A large randomized trial of communities in rural Malawi shows that a single community meeting providing information on how antiretroviral therapy makes people less likely to transmit the virus can have a significant impact both on HIV stigma and HIV testing. The results were presented at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2015) last month in Vancouver.

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IAS 2015: Implant and Injectable Hormonal Contraception Most Effective Methods for Women with HIV

Hormonal contraceptive methods are highly effective in reducing the risk of pregnancy in women living with HIV whether on antiretroviral therapy (ART) or not, according to an evaluation involving over 5000 women, according to a report at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention in Vancouver last month.

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IAS 2015: HIV Treatment Scale-up Linked to Reduced Mortality Among Vancouver Drug Injectors

HIV-related and all-cause death decreased significantly among people who inject drugs -- with similar declines for both women and men -- since the introduction of expanded access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) as part of a "treatment as prevention" initiative in Vancouver, researchers reported last month at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention. These findings support recommendations to treat everyone with HIV, both to benefit their own health and to reduce transmission.

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IAS 2015: A Community Perspective on HIV Prevention Science [VIDEO]

Dazon Dixon Diallo from SisterLove, Inc. in Atlanta and the U.S. Women and PrEP Working Group offered a community perspective at a press briefing on early antiretroviral therapy (ART), treatment as prevention, and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) research at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention last month in Vancouver.

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IAS 2015: HIV+ Youth Are Less Likely than Adults to Achieve Viral Suppression on ART

While adolescents and young adults are about as likely as older people to be linked to care after being diagnosed with HIV, less than a third were retained in care or started antiretroviral therapy (ART), and only 7% reached undetectable viral load -- much lower than the rate for older individuals, researchers reported at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention last month in Vancouver. Prompt referral to youth-friendly services, however, increased the likelihood of viral suppression.alt

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IAS 2015: Altered Cholesterol Metabolism May Protect Immune Cells of Non-Progressors

Enhanced cholesterol metabolism in certain immune cells may help explain why some people with HIV can naturally control the virus with little or no disease progression, according to research presented at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention and at the preceding IAS Towards an HIV Cure Symposium last month in Vancouver. The findings suggest that regulating cellular cholesterol metabolism may offer a new approach to controlling HIV and potentially achieving a functional cure, or long-term remission.

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IAS 2015: Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies Against HIV [VIDEO]

Broadly neutralizing antibodies that can recognize multiple strains of HIV may be one component of a combination strategy to achieve long-term HIV remission, experts said at a media briefing on HIV cure research at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention this week in Vancouver.

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IAS 2015: Indiana HIV Outbreak -- Lessons about Containing Local Outbreaks and Harm Reduction

An early 2015 outbreak of HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in rural Indiana linked to injection of prescription opiates offers a good example to how to track and contain a localized outbreak, according to a pair of presentations at a late-breaking prevention research session at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention last month in Vancouver. Attendees at the session stressed that we already know how to prevent such outbreaks, and called for implementation of needle exchange programs and other proven-effective harm reduction measures.

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