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CROI 2008: Boosted Atazanavir (Reyataz) and Lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra) Have Similar Efficacy, but Different Side Effects: CASTLE

As antiretroviral therapy had improved, there are now multiple drug regimens that can produce full HIV suppression. However other factors -- including immediate side effects, long-term toxicities, and convenience -- may vary considerably. At the 15th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections this week in Boston, researchers reported data from the CASTLE trial, which compared 2 of the most widely used protease inhibitors, ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (Reyataz) and lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra), in treatment-naive participants. 

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CROI 2008: Abacavir/3TC (Epzicom) Matches Tenofovir/Emtricitabine (Truvada) for Treatment-naive Patients: HEAT Study

While there is always much interest in new antiretroviral drug classes, research continues as well on the earliest type of anti-HIV therapy, nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). At the 15th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2008) this week in Boston, researchers presented data from the HEAT (Head-to-head Epzicom And Truvada) trial, a direct comparison of 2 double-NRTI backbones.

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Monoclonal Antibody CCR5 Inhibitor PRO 140 Produces Long-lasting HIV Suppression in Single-dose Study

In order to enter human CD4 T-cells, HIV must bind to both the CD4 receptor on the cell surface and 1 of 2 co-receptors, CCR5 or CXCR4. If the virus cannot attach to a co-receptor, it cannot infect new cells. The first oral CCR5 antagonist, maraviroc (Selzentry) was recently approved, and another such agent, vicriviroc, has shown promising results in clinical trials.

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Atazanavir (Reyataz) Label Changes Cover Drug Interactions, Kidney Impairment

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration this week announced revisions to the package insert for the protease inhibitor atazanavir (Reyataz), reflecting new information about administration with food, interaction with several drugs, and use by patients with impaired kidney function.

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SMART Data Confirm Risk of CD4-guided Treatment Interruptions

Interruption of antiretroviral therapy is a potentially hazardous strategy associated with an increased risk of disease progression or death, according to data from the large international SMART (Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy) study.

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