EASL 2009: Antiviral Agents with Activity against Both HIV and Hepatitis C Virus

Standard therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection consists of pegylated interferon plus ribavirin, but several novel agents under study directly target various steps of the HCV lifecycle, an approach known as "STAT-C." Some of these investigational agents work similarly to certain antiretroviral drugs for HIV, suggesting it may be possible to develop drugs that have activity against both HIV-HCV, a potential benefit for HIV-HCV coinfected patients.

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EASL 2009: Does HBV Viral Load Level Predict Development of Liver Fibrosis?

Two studies presented at the 44th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL 2009) last month in Copenhagen looked at the association between HBV DNA level and development of fibrosis, with findings suggesting that the role of HBV viral load differs for hepatitis B "e" antigen (HBeAg) negative and HBeAg positive individuals.

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Researchers Report Promising Results from Studies of 3 Therapeutic HCV Vaccines

Current standard therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection consists of pegylated interferon plus ribavirin, and several directly targeted oral anti-HCV agents are in advanced stages of development. But another approach -- therapeutic vaccines -- is also under study, as reported in 3 presentations at the 44th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL 2009) last month in Copenhagen.

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Acute Hepatitis C Affects Neurocognitive Functioning in People with HIV

Acute coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) can contribute to neurocognitive impairment in people with HIV, according to a British study presented at the 44th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL 2009) last month in Copenhagen.

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Active Injection Drug Users and Those on Opiate Substitution Treatment Can Have Good Hepatitis C Therapy Outcomes

Active injection drug users (IDUs) and those receiving opiate substitution can be successfully treated for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, according to a French study presented at the 44th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL 2009) last month in Copenhagen.

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