Predictors of Sustained Treatment Response in HIV-HCV Coinfected Patients Receiving Routine Care

As reported at the recent Digestive Disease Week annual meeting (DDW 2009) in Chicago, Lisa Backus and colleagues evaluated the predictors of sustained virological response (SVR) for HIV-HCV coinfected patients receiving pegylated interferon plus ribavirin in routine care at Veterans Affairs (VA) medical facilities.

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DDW 2009: Does HIV/HCV Coinfection Increase the Risk of Liver Disease Progression and Worsen Clinical Outcomes?

A growing body of evidence indicates that HIV positive people coinfected with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection tend to experience more rapid liver disease progression, although not all studies have seen this effect, especially among individuals who are taking highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and have relatively high CD4 cell counts. The stream of conflicting data continued at the Digestive Disease Week (DDW 2009) annual meeting last week in Chicago, with one study finding no difference in fibrosis progression between HCV monoinfected and HIV/HCV coinfected people, while another showed worse clinical outcomes in coinfected patients.

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DDW 2009: Vitamin B12 Levels May Help Predict Response to Interferon-based Therapy for Chronic Hepatitis C

Serum levels of vitamin B12 may be among the factors that can help predict whether patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection will respond to interferon-based treatment, according to a study by researchers from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm presented this week at the annual Digestive Disease Week (DDW 2009) meeting in Chicago.

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DDW 2009: Strategies for Managing Acetaminophen-related Liver Disease and Acute Liver Failure

The number of patients with acute liver failure (ALF) is growing in one way that can be prevented: toxicity due to acetaminophen (marketed as Tylenol and many other brands and generics). Therapeutic advances are improving the outlook for people with acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, though some of these are not yet ready for widespread use. During an American Association for the Study of Liver Disease (AASLD) clinical symposium held at the annual Digestive Disease Week meeting (DDW 2009) taking place this week in Chicago, 4 experts in the field offered a look at future strategies for preventing and treating acetaminophen-related liver disease, according to DDW Daily News, the official conference newspaper.

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