DDW 2014: Outcomes in HBV/HCV Coinfected People Depend on Which Virus Dominates

Among HBV/HCV coinfected people, about half have dominant hepatitis B virus while half have dominant hepatitis C, and those with active HBV replication are at higher risk of liver-related complications and death, according to study findings presented at Digestive Disease Week this month in Chicago.

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DDW 2014: Some Negative Predictive Factors Do Not Impair Response to Faldaprevir

Some factors traditionally associated with poorer response to interferon-based therapy for hepatitis C played little role in clinical trials of the HCV protease inhibitor faldaprevir, according to several studies presented at Digestive Disease Week this month in Chicago. HCV subtype 1a and prior treatment did not significantly worsen response, while HIV/HCV coinfection may be associated with better response.

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DDW 2014: Sustained Response to Interferon Is Durable in Children with Hepatitis C

Children with hepatitis C treated with interferon-based therapy continued to show undetectable HCV viral load up to 7 years after achieving sustained virological response in the PEDS-C trial, researchers reported at Digestive Disease Week this month in Chicago.

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DDW 2014 and EASL 2014: Rifaximin May Be Beneficial for People with Advanced Liver Cirrhosis

The antibiotic rifaximin may help prevent or improve hepatic encephalopathy and bleeding varices in people with decompensated liver disease, according to studies presented at the recent EASL International Liver Congress and Digestive Disease Week.

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DDW 2014: AbbVie Interferon-free Regimen Cures More than 90% of Hepatitis C Patients

AbbVie's all-oral "3D" regimen containing ABT-450, ombitasvir, and dasabuvir, used with or without ribavirin, led to sustained virological response in 90% to 100% of genotype 1a and 1b hepatitis C patients in the Phase 3 PEARL trials, according to data reported at the Digestive Disease Week (DDW 2014) meeting last week in Chicago and in the May 4 online edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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