AASLD 2015: Sofosbuvir Plus Ribavirin Shows Suboptimal Efficacy for Acute Hepatitis C

A combination of sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) and ribavirin cured more than 90% of HIV-positive people with acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) in a small study, but a similar trial of the same regimen saw a much higher relapse rate, according to a pair of presentations at the AASLD Liver Meeting this past November.

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AASLD 2015: MiR-122 Inhibitor RG-101 Suppresses Hepatitis C Virus with Single Dose

A single injection of RG-101, an experimental drug that targets the micro RNA miR-122 in liver cells, reduced hepatitis C virus (HCV) levels by more than 4 log in people with HCV genotypes 1, 3, and 4, and 21% of treated patients still had undetectable virus levels 28 weeks after dosing, according to research presented at the AASLD Liver Meeting in November.

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AASLD 2015: U.S. Faces Biggest Burden of Hepatitis C Treatment Costs Before 2020

The cost of treating hepatitis C is likely to decline dramatically over the next decade in the U.S., not because of cuts in drug prices, but because the population in need of treatment will shrink by 2020 as a majority of patients will already have been treated, according to research by Jagpreet Chhatwal of Massachusetts General Hospital and colleagues presented at the AASLD Liver Meeting in San Francisco last month.

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AASLD 2015: 3-Drug Combos for 8 Weeks Demonstrate High Hepatitis C Cure Rate

An interferon-free regimen containing Merck's grazoprevir, the NS5A inhibitors elbasvir or MK8404, and the experimental nucleotide polymerase inhibitor MK-3682, taken for 8 weeks, cured more than 90% of non-cirrhotic hepatitis C patients with HCV genotypes 1, 2, or 3, according to late-breaking research presented at the AASLD Liver Meeting in November.

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AASLD 2015: Grazoprevir/ Elbasvir Cures More than 90% of People with HIV/HCV Coinfection

Merck's grazoprevir/elbasvir combination cured 93% of people with HIV and hepatitis C coinfection, was well-tolerated, and did not appear to interact with antiretrovirals, according to final results from the C-EDGE Co-infection study presented at the 2015 AASLD Liver Meeting last month in San Francisco. These results confirm that HIV/HCV coinfected people respond as well to interferon-free therapy as those with HCV alone.

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