PAS 2017: New Approaches Help Babies with Opioid Withdrawal Syndrome

Letting mothers and babies room together and using methadone or buprenorphine instead of morphine to manage withdrawal symptoms leads to shorter stays and other benefits for newborns with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), according to several presentations at the Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting this month in San Francisco.

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PAS 2017: Many Doctors Wary of Providing PrEP for Young Patients

Only about a third of family practice and pediatric providers said they would be likely to prescribe HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to adolescent patients, underlining the need to educate providers outside the HIV and sexually transmitted disease fields, according to a report at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting last week in San Francisco.

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PAS 2017: Children on Immunosuppressive Therapy May Lose Hepatitis B Vaccine Protection

More than half of children treated with immunosuppressive drugs for gastrointestinal or rheumatological conditions no longer had protective levels of antibodies against hepatitis B virus (HBV) and may require repeat vaccinations, according to a study presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting last week in San Francisco.

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PAS 2017: Sofosbuvir Plus Ribavirin Cures Teens with Genotype 2 or 3 Hepatitis C

A 2-drug regimen of sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) and ribavirin taken for 12 weeks led to sustained virological response in all treated adolescents with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 2, while a 24-week course cured all but one teen with harder-to-treat genotype 3, according to a presentation at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting last week in San Francisco.

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PAS 2017: Vaccine Reduces Human Papillomavirus Prevalence Among Young Women

The prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) types included in the most widely used vaccine has decreased among adolescent and young women in the U.S., with "herd immunity" extending to those who were not vaccinated themselves, according to study results presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting last week in San Francisco.

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