The Liver Meeting, The 62nd Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases

November 4-8, 2011 - San Francisco

AASLD 2011: Adding Tenofovir to Entecavir Offers No Additional Benefit for Hepatitis B Patients

Dual therapy using entecavir (Baraclude) plus tenofovir (Viread) did not work better than entecavir alone in a 3-year study of previously untreated chronic hepatitis B patients, according to a presentation at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases Liver Meeting (AASLD 2011) last week in San Francisco.alt

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AASLD 2011: Long-term Tenofovir for HIV/HBV Coinfection

Tenofovir showed long-term antiviral activity against hepatitis B virus (HBV) lasting 5 to 8 years, with minimal evidence of kidney toxicity, and HBsAg levels declined steadily over time, according to 2 posters presented this week at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases Liver Meeting (AASLD 2011) in San Francisco.

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AASLD 2011: Telaprevir Improves Hepatitis C Treatment Response for HIV/HCV Coinfected People

Adding the hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitor telaprevir (Incivek) to pegylated interferon plus ribavirin increased virological response rates at 24 weeks for HIV/HCV coinfected patients, researchers reported at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases Liver Meeting (AASLD 2011) this week in San Francisco.alt

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AASLD 2011: High Rate of Cancer-Causing HPV among Women with Hepatitis C Awaiting Liver Transplants

Nearly 1 in 5 women undergoing liver transplantation -- most of them due to chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection -- were also infected with cancer-causing types of human papillomavirus (HPV), even though their behavioral risk was low, researchers reported at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases Liver Meeting (AASLD 2011) this week in San Francisco. alt

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AASLD 2011: Engineered Poxvirus Shows Promise for Treating Advanced Liver Cancer

A genetically engineered vaccinia poxvirus (JX-594) can rapidly destroy tumors and prolong survival of people with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), according to a late-breaker presentation at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases Liver Meeting (AASLD 2011) this week in San Francisco.alt

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