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June 27 Is National HIV Testing Day

June 27 is National HIV Testing Day (NHTD), an annual opportunity to promote HIV screening and awareness. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 1 in 6 people with HIV do not know they are infected, and therefore are not receiving the care and treatment that could improve their own health and prevent transmission. The CDC this week issued new recommendations using modern technology to facilitate earlier diagnosis.

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Nearly 25% of HIV Diagnosed in Emergency Rooms Is Acute Infection

Only a small percentage of the more than 22,000 people tested for HIV at an emergency department in Phoenix were found to be infected, but of these nearly one-quarter had acute or recent infection, during which viral load is high and onward transmission is more likely, according to a study published in the June 22 advance edition of Annals of Emergency Medicine.

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U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommends Routine HIV Screening for Adolescents and Adults

On April 30 the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) issued a "Grade A," or highest-level, recommendation that all adolescents and adults ages 15 through 65 years should receive routine HIV screening. "These recommendations...reinforce the importance of people everywhere knowing their HIV status and, if positive, accessing care, receiving treatment and other prevention services," said CDC's Jonathan Mermin.

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New Recommendations for Earlier HIV Screening and PrEP for Women

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists last week issued 2 new recommendations on screening and prevention of HIV in women. The first matches the CDC's recommendation that HIV screening should start at age 13 and should be offered at least annually to at-risk women. The second advises that pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) -- using antiretroviral medications such as Truvada to prevent HIV infection -- may be a useful tool for women at highest risk, including those with HIV positive male partners.

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Only 1 in 5 Medicaid Users Linked to Care Within a Year After HIV Diagnosis

Only about 20% of adult Medicaid recipients who tested positive for HIV during the past decade began receiving appropriate care -- including CDC T-cell count and viral load monitoring -- within a year of diagnosis, and the rate did not improve much within 5 years, according to an analysis described in the January 2013 issue of Sexually Transmitted Diseases.

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FDA Approves First Rapid HIV Test That Can Detect Acute Infection

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) this month approved a new rapid diagnostic test that detects antibodies against both HIV-1 and HIV-2, as well as the HIV-1 p24 antigen. Detection of the antigen but not antibodies indicates acute infection, allowing for the possibility of improved prevention and earlier treatment.

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U.S. Task Force Recommends HIV Screening for Teens, Adults, Pregnant Women

Adolescents and adults between the ages of 15 and 65 years should be routinely screened for HIV, and people outside this age range should also be tested if they are at risk of infection, according to draft recommendations from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) issued this week. The Task Force also advised that all pregnant women should be screened for the virus. alt

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June 27 Is National HIV Testing Day

Today (June 27) is National HIV Testing Day, started by the National Association of People with AIDS and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2 decades ago to raise awareness about HIV and encourage people to learn their status.alt

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FDA Approves OraQuick Home HIV Antibody Test

On July 3, 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the OraQuick In-Home HIV Test, the first over-the-counter self-administered HIV antibody test that can be performed entirely outside a medical setting.

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