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Pregnancy & HIV MTCT

Triple Antiretroviral Therapy Best for Preventing Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission

A 3-drug regimen containing lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra) plus 2 nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) was more effective at preventing perinatal HIV transmission than taking a single drug during pregnancy, another during labor, and 2 more after delivery, according to findings from the PROMISE study.

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AIDS 2014: Mothers Starting Option B+ ART in Malawi Often Lost from Care

Although Malawi’s policy of offering lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) to women with HIV who are pregnant or breastfeeding resulted in a 7-fold increase in women receiving treatment in 15 months, implementers are concerned by high rates of loss to follow-up, researchers reported at the 20th International AIDS Conference in Melbourne.

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Updated Perinatal ART Guidelines for Pregnant Women with HIV

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has updated its guidelines for use of antiretroviral drugs by pregnant women with HIV, intended both to improve the health of women and to prevent transmission of the virus to their infants during gestation or delivery.

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AIDS 2014: Increased ART for Mothers Does Not Guarantee Optimal Care for Infants

The significant increase in access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for all pregnant women living with HIV in Malawi after implementation of Option B+ contrasts with low coverage of early diagnosis and uptake of cotrimoxazole prophylaxis for HIV-exposed infants, Priscilla Idele of UNICEF reported at the 20th International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2014) last month in Melbourne.

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CROI 2014: STIs Increase Risk of HIV Infection During Pregnancy

Pregnant women in Kenya have a similar risk of HIV infection during pregnancy as women in serodiscordant couples or sex workers, but women with a history of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) had nearly a 4-fold increased risk of acute HIV infection, John Kinuthia from the University of Nairobireported at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) last month in Boston.

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