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Pregnancy & HIV MTCT

Updated Perinatal ART Guidelines for Pregnant Women with HIV

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has updated its guidelines for use of antiretroviral drugs by pregnant women with HIV, intended both to improve the health of women and to prevent transmission of the virus to their infants during gestation or delivery.

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CROI 2014: STIs Increase Risk of HIV Infection During Pregnancy

Pregnant women in Kenya have a similar risk of HIV infection during pregnancy as women in serodiscordant couples or sex workers, but women with a history of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) had nearly a 4-fold increased risk of acute HIV infection, John Kinuthia from the University of Nairobireported at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) last month in Boston.

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CROI 2014: Lopinavir or Lamivudine Equally Protective Against HIV During Breast-feeding

Peri-exposure prophylaxis using either lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra) or lamivudine (3TC, Epivir) proved equally protective as infant prophylaxis against HIV infection during 12 months of breast-feeding, according to a report at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) this month in Boston.

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CROI 2014: Efavirenz Matches Lopinavir/ritonavir for Perinatal HIV Treatment

Pregnant women taking efavirenz-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) had significantly better virological outcomes at the time of delivery compared to those taking lopinavir/ ritonavir in a randomized study in rural Uganda, according to a report at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) in Boston this month.

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Protein in Breast Milk May Help Prevent Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission

A natural protein in human breast milk, known as tenascin-C, blocks HIV entry by binding to the viral envelope and preventing it from attaching to host cell co-receptors, possibly helping explain the low rate of mother-to-child HIV infection via breast-feeding, according to research published in the October 21, 2013, advance edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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