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ICAAC 2014: Tenofovir Vaginal Ring and Nanoparticle Gel Are Protective in Animal Studies

A vaginal ring that dispenses tenofovir protected all 6 macaque monkeys exposed to an HIV-like virus, while a heat-sensitive vaginal gel containing tenofovir nanoparticles prevented infection of mice, researchers reported at the 54th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy last week in Washington, DC.

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NIH Awards Grant for Vaginal Ring for HIV Prevention

The National Institutes of Health has awarded a $20 million grant to a consortium that will seek to develop an intravaginal ring that delivers antiretroviral drugs for prevention of HIV infection, the participating research institutions recently announced. The collaboration will test various combinations of antiretrovirals to determine which are most effective when delivered together for pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP.

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Microbicide Gel Protects against Vaginal or Anal Transmission of HIV and Other STIs

An experimental microbicide gel known as MZC offers protection against multiple strains of HIV, herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), and human papillomavirus (HPV), and it appears safe for either vaginal or rectal use, according to an animal study by researchers at the Population Council.

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Dapivirine Vaginal Ring Study Fully Enrolled, New Technology Shows Promise

The Microbicide Trials Network (MTN) announced last week that the Phase 3 ASPIRE trial, testing a vaginal ring containing the NNRTI dapivirine for preventing sexual transmission of HIV, has completed enrollment with more than 2600 women. In related news, researchers reported promising findings from a study of a novel "pod" technology for delivering multiple drugs for HIV prevention in a vagina ring.

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CROI 2014: Self-Reports Did Not Reflect Actual Gel or Pill Use in VOICE PrEP Trial

Self-reported adherence to daily tenofovir or Truvada pills or tenofovir vaginal gel for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) against HIV infection did not match drug levels in the body, helping to explain the lack of protection seen in the VOICE trial, researchers reported at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) this month in Boston.

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