Coinfection

IAS 2015: HIV and Hepatitis B Coinfected People Can Safely Switch to Simpler TAF Single-Tablet Regimen

HIV-positive people with hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection maintained HIV viral suppression, maintained or achieved HBV suppression, and showed improvements in kidney and bone markers when they switched to a single-tablet regimen containing the integrase inhibitor elvitegravir and a new safer formulation of tenofovir, according to a late-breaking poster presented at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention last month in Vancouver.

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Coverage of the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic infections (CROI 2015), February 23-26, 2015, in Seattle.

Conference highlights include PrEP and HIV treatment as prevention, hepatitis C treatment for HIV/HCV coinfected people, new antiretroviral drugs, HIV cure research, HIV-related conditions, TB, Ebola virus, and access to care.

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage by topic

CROI website

3/2/15

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Coverage of the 2014 AASLD Liver Meeting

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 65th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD 2014) in Boston, November 7-11, 2014.

Conference highlights include new interferon-free therapy for hepatitis C -- including options for people with cirrhosis, and liver transplant recipients -- treatment for hepatitis B, and prevention and management of advanced liver disease.

Full listing by topic

The Liver Meeting website

12/2/14

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CROI 2015: Retrovirus Conference Now Underway in Seattle

The 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) takes place this week, February 23-26, at the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle. CROI focuses on HIV treatment, prevention, and basic science. For the past several years it has also included substantial hepatitis C content, and this year will feature presentations on Ebola virus. HIVandHepatitis.com is on site in Seattle all week bringing you news coverage and Twitter updates (@HIVandHepatitis).

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IDWeek 2014: HIV and Hepatitis B Coinfection Linked to Hip Fractures

People with HIV/HBV coinfection being treated for both diseases had a significantly higher risk of hip fractures than patients with HIV alone or neither virus, according to research presented at IDWeek 2014 last week in Philadelphia.

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CROI 2015: Retrovirus Conference Starts Monday in Seattle

The 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) takes place next week, February 23-26, at the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle. CROI focuses on HIV treatment, prevention, and basic science. For the past several years it has also included substantial hepatitis C content, and this year will feature presentations on Ebola virus. HIVandHepatitis.com will be on site in Seattle all week bringing you news coverage and Twitter updates (@HIVandHepatitis).

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Tenofovir Usually Suppresses Hepatitis B in HIV/HBV Coinfected People

Tenofovir led to undetectable hepatitis B virus (HBV) levels in 87% of HIV positive coinfected individuals, and a similar proportion maintained viral suppression over 6 years, according to a study described in the June 20 advance edition of Hepatology.

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Coverage of the 2014 AASLD Liver Meeting

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 65th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD 2014) in Boston, November 7-11, 2014.

Conference highlights include new interferon-free therapy for hepatitis C -- including options for people with cirrhosis, and liver transplant recipients -- treatment for hepatitis B, and prevention and management of advanced liver disease.

Full listing by topic

The Liver Meeting website

12/2/14

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ASCO: HCV Reactivation, Brain Involvement Do Not Worsen Lymphoma Survival for People with HIV

Reactivation of hepatitis C was common among HIV positive people with lymphoma, but did not appear to lead to worse outcomes or decreased survival, according to a study presented at the 50th American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting this week in Chicago. A related study found that having central nervous system involvement at the time of diagnosis did not decrease survival of people with AIDS-related lymphoma.

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