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New British Guidelines Recommend Treatment for Everyone with HIV

Everyone with HIV who is prepared to take antiretroviral treatment should receive it, regardless of CD4 cell count, new draft British HIV Association (BHIVA) treatment guidelines recommend. The new draft guidelines, published for consultation this week, say that anyone living with HIV who understands the commitment of antiretroviral therapy and is ready to start should receive treatment. The change -- from a recommendation to start treatment before the CD4 cell count falls below 350 cells/mm3 to treatment for all -- follows the results of the START trial, a keenly awaited international study of when to start treatment.

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START Study Confirms Benefits of Early HIV Treatment

Long-awaited results from the START study show that people with HIV who start antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after diagnosis, while their CD4 T-cell count is still high, have a lower risk of illness and death than those who wait, according to a May 27 announcement from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

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Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Reduces HIV Viral Load in Early Human Study

A novel broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody known as 3BNC117 inhibited HIV replication its the first Phase 1 clinical trial in humans, according to a letter in the April 8 online edition of Nature. A single infusion of 3BNC117 reduced HIV viral load by up to 2.5 logs and viremia remained significantly lower for 28 days, the researchers wrote.

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First START Results Show Early HIV Treatments Reduces Risk of Illness and Death

Long-awaited interim findings from the START trial have shown that people with HIV who were randomly assigned to start antiretroviral therapy (ART) while their CD4 count was above 500 cells/mm3 had a 53% lower risk of AIDS-related and non-AIDS illnesses and deaths compared to those who waited until their count fell below 350 cells/mm3, according to an announcement today from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

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Long-time Researcher Discusses Myths About HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Cure

Over the 3 decades of the epidemic a number of misconceptions have arisen about HIV infection, how the immune system fights the virus, and how best to treat and potentially cure it, along with a number of important questions that remain unanswered, according to an opinion article in the April 13 advance edition of Trends in Molecular Medicine by Jay Levy from the University of California at San Francisco, one of the first researchers to study HIV. The trend toward earlier antiretroviral therapy and treatment-as-prevention are among the issues he contests.

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BHIVA 2015: Many People with HIV Willing to Take Part in Cure Research Despite its Risks

There is a strong interest among people living with HIV in research towards an HIV cure, with many potential participants willing to consider antiretroviral treatment interruption. Respondents to a survey presented at the British HIV Association (BHIVA) conference this week in Brighton generally understood that they would be unlikely to benefit personally from cure research. Priorities for a cure were to eliminate health problems and the risk of HIV transmission, rather than necessarily testing HIV-negative.

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DHHS Updates Antiretroviral Treatment Guidelines for Adults and Children

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has released updated versions of its antiretroviral treatment guidelines for adults and adolescents, and for children with HIV. The new adult guidelines include revised recommendations for first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) as well as management of treatment-experienced patients. The revised pediatric guidelines include a discussion of very early treatment for HIV-infected infants.

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