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Race/Ethnicity

Today Is National Native HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

March 20 marks the 9th annual observation of National Native HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NNHAAD), an occasion to highlight the impact of HIV and AIDS on American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian communities.

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Black People with HIV Have Less Linkage to Care, Higher Rate of Death

Coinciding with National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day last week, a pair of reports in the February 6 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report look at health disparities among African-Americans living with HIV. One study found that while the mortality rate among black people with HIV is falling, it is still 13% higher that that of whites. The second found that only about half of black people diagnosed with HIV were not linked to care. 

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October 15 is National Latino AIDS Awareness Day

October 15 is National Latino AIDS Awareness Day(NLAAD), an opportunity to raise awareness about HIV/AIDS among Latino and Hispanic people in the U.S. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), while Latinos/Hispanics make up approximately 16% of the total U.S. population, they accounted for about 21% of all new HIV infections in 2010. The incidence rate for Latinos is about 3 times higher than that of whites, with a majority of cases occurring among young men who have sex with men.

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Saturday is National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

Saturday, February 7, is National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NBHAAD), an opportunity to raise awareness about the disproportionate burden of HIV/AIDS among African Americans. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), African Americans represent approximately 12% of the U.S. population, but accounted for 44% of new HIV infections and 43% of all people living with HIV in 2010.

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Maraviroc Dose May Be Too Low for Many African-American People with HIV

A standard dose of the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc (Selzentry) may not be effective for many black people with HIV due to a genetic variation which increases production of a cytochrome P450 protein that speeds up processing of the drug, according to a study published in the August 12 advance edition of Drug Metabolism and Disposition.

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