Back HIV Prevention Pre-exposure (PrEP)

Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)

IAS 2017: PrEP Use in U.S. Exceeds 100,000 in Gilead Pharmacy Survey

An estimated 120,000 people in the U.S. have started Truvada (tenofovir/emtricitabine) for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) since 2012, according to the latest findings from a survey of retail and mail-order pharmacies by Gilead Sciences, presented at the recent 9th IAS Conference on HIV Science (IAS 2017) in Paris.

alt

Read more:

IAS 2017: Novel Long-Acting Drug Shows Promise for HIV Treatment and PrEP

A single oral dose of MK-8591, a long-acting antiretroviral in a novel drug class, suppressed HIV for 7 days in an early clinical trial, and the drug also appears to protect monkeys from rectal infection with an HIV-like virus, researchers reported at the 9th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Science (IAS 2017) last month in Paris.

alt

Read more:

IAS 2017: Long-Acting Cabotegravir Shows Promise For HIV Prevention

A long-acting injectable formulation of cabotegravir given every 8 weeks produces high enough drugs levels in both men and women to offer protection against HIV, according to results from the HPTN 077 study presented this week at the 9th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Science (IAS 2017) in Paris. But another injectable prevention candidate, long-acting rilpivirine, has been abandoned.

alt

Read more:

IAS 2017: Demonstration Projects Explore Feasibility of PrEP for Adolescents in South Africa

One of the first studies to explore the acceptability, safety, and use of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in adolescents in an African context has found that PrEP was safe and tolerable, although PrEP usage and adherence did tail off during the 12 months of the program.

alt

Read more:

IAS 2017: PrEP Still Protected People Who Had Less Sex in Ipergay Study

A sub-study of the French Ipergay trial of "on-demand" pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has found that PrEP was just as effective for participants who had sex less often than average, and so took PrEP less often, as long as they did take it when it was needed. The analysis was presented by trial statistician Guillemette Antoni at the 9th International AIDS Society Conference (IAS 2017) conference this week in Paris.

alt

Read more: