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IAS 2015: WAVES Shows Elvitegravir Regimen Beats Boosted Atazanavir for Women with HIV

A study of antiretroviral treatment specifically for women with HIV showed that a single-tablet regimen containing the integrase inhibitor elvitegravir suppressed the virus better than a regimen containing ritonavir-boosted atazanavir, according to a poster presented at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention last month in Vancouver. This study is important in part because it demonstrates that including more women in clinical trials is feasible.

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CROI 2015: Does Emtricitabine Work Better than Lamivudine in Combination ART?

People with HIV who started an antiretroviral regimen containing emtricitabine (FTC; Emtriva) and NNRTIs were about half as likely to experience virological treatment failure as those who used the similar drug lamivudine (3TC; Epivir), according to an analysis of more than 6000 participants in the Dutch ATHENA cohort presented at the recent 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle. No significant differences between emtricitabine and lamivudine were seen with boosted protease inhibitor regimens.

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Atazanavir Associated with Less HIV Treatment Failure, Illness, and Death

People with HIV who used antiretroviral regimens containing the ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor atazanavir (Reyataz) had better outcomes than those taking lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra), including lower likelihood of AIDS-defining illnesses or death, less virological failure, and larger CD4 T-cell increases, according to a study published in the January 6 edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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CROI 2015: Antiretroviral Therapy -- Past, Present and Future [VIDEO]

Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has undergone a remarkable evolution from AZT monotherapy in the late 1980s, to effective combination therapy in the mid-1990s, to today's well-tolerated single-tablet regimens. But questions about the optimal time to start treatment remain unanswered and getting ART to everyone who needs it is still a challenge, according to a presentation by David Cooper at the recent 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle.

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FDA Approves 2 New Boosted Protease Inhibitor Coformulations for HIV

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) this week approved 2 new fixed-dose coformulations of HIV protease inhibitors with a cobicistat booster. Bristol-Myers Squibb's Evotaz contains atazanavir (sold separately as Reyataz) plus cobicistat, while Janssen Therapeutics' Prezcobix contains darunavir (sold separately as Prezista) plus cobicistat.

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