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ViiV and Janssen To Collaborate on Long-Acting Injectable HIV Treatment

ViiV Healthcare and Janssen have announced a plan to work together on the development of long-acting injectable HIV treatment using ViiV's investigational integrase inhibitor cabotegravir and an injected formulation of Janssen's currently available oral NNRTI rilpivirine (Edurant).

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FDA Approves Gilead's Genvoya Single-tablet Regimen with Tenofovir Alafenamide

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced on November 5 the approval of Gilead Sciences' Genvoya, a new once-daily single-tablet regimen containing the integrase inhibitor elvitegravir, the booster cobicistat, emtricitabine, and tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) -- a new formulation that is easier on the kidneys and bones than the older tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF).

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EACS 2015: HIV Maturation Inhibitor BMS-955176 Shows Good Safety and Efficacy in Phase 2a Trial

Bristol-Myers Squibb's next-generation maturation inhibitor BMS-955176 demonstrated good antiviral activity against HIV subtypes B and C in a short proof-of-concept study, and appeared to be safe and well-tolerated, according to findings presented last week at the 15th European AIDS Conference in Barcelona.

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Long-acting Injectable Cabotegravir + Rilpivirine Maintains HIV Suppression for 32 Weeks

A combination of 2 long-acting injectable antiretrovirals -- ViiV Healthcare's experimental integrase inhibitor cabotegravir and Janssen's NNRTI rilpivirine -- given once every 4 or 8 weeks maintained viral suppression as well as a standard oral regimen and appears safe and well-tolerated, the companies announced this week. These findings from the Phase 2b LATTE 2 trial follow earlier reports from the original LATTE study showing that oral cabotegravir plus rilpivirine suppressed HIV as well as an efavirenz-based regimen, but with fewer side effects.

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EACS 2015: TAF Single-Tablet Regimen Shows Good Efficacy, Improved Kidney and Bone Safety

A single-tablet regimen containing the new tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) -- to be marketed as Genvoya -- suppressed HIV as well as a coformulation containing the older tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), according to a poster presented this week at the 15th European AIDS Conference in Barcelona. A related studyfound that people who switched from an atazanavir (Reyataz)-based regimen to the new combo had superior virological outcomes, and in both clinical trialsparticipants saw improvements in kidney and bone biomarkers.

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