Back Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C

DDW 2015: Sofosbuvir + Daclatasvir for 12 Weeks Cures Most HIV/HCV Coinfected Patients

Nearly all HIV/HCV coinfected patients treated for 12 weeks with an interferon- and ribavirin-free regimen of sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) and daclatasvir (Daklinza) achieved sustained virological response, but the cure rate fell to 76% for those treated for only 8 weeks, according to results from the ALLY-2 trial presented at Digestive Disease Week 2015 this month in Washington, DC.

alt

 

EASL 2015: Liver Function and Quality of Life Improve after Treatment with Viekira Pak Regimen

Hepatitis C patients treated with AbbVie's Viekira Pak "3D" regimen saw improvements in liver function biomarkers, reported better quality of life, and had increased survival compared to untreated people, according to studies presented at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) 50th International Liver Congress last month in Vienna. Other research showed that treatment can be cost-effective at all stages of liver disease.

alt

EASL 2015: Hepatitis C Treatment May Be Highly Cost-effective for Prisoners in England

Reducing the duration of direct-acting antiviral therapy for hepatitis C will make treatment for prisoners in England highly cost-effective, and could provide an important opportunity for providing access to hepatitis C treatment for people who inject drugs, Natasha Martin from the University of California San Diego reported at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) 50th International Liver Congress last month in Vienna.

alt

EASL 2015: Survey Shows Half of People with Hepatitis B or C Experience Discrimination

A majority of people with hepatitis B or C tell family, friends, and sometimes work colleagues about their infection, but this often leads to discrimination including avoiding physical contact, not being invited to social events, and even loss of employment, according to study of American and European patients presented at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) 50th International Liver Congress last month in Vienna.

alt

DDW 2015/EASL 2015: Statins Associated with Lower Risk of Death and Liver Decompensation

Hepatitis C patients with liver cirrhosis were significantly less likely to progress to decompensated disease and less likely to die if they used statins to control blood cholesterol, according to an analysis of U.S. veterans presented at the Digestive Disease Week meeting this week in Washington, DC, and at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) 50th International Liver Congress last month in Vienna. Another recent study found that statins were associated with better response to hepatitis C treatment and lower risk of liver cancer.

alt

EASL 2015: Hepatitis B Patients on Long-term Entecavir or Tenofovir Have Low Mortality but HCC Remains a Risk

More than 95% of people with chronic hepatitis B were still alive after 5 years on antiviral therapy with entecavir (Baraclude) or tenofovir (Viread), and most deaths were due to non-liver-related causes, but hepatocellular carcinoma was still a major factor affecting mortality, researchers reported presented at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) 50th International Liver Congress last month in Vienna. 

alt

Today is Hepatitis Testing Day

Tuesday, May 19, is the fourth annual Hepatitis Testing Day, a key date in Hepatitis Awareness Month. The day is opportunity to raise awareness about the importance of screening for hepatitis B and C. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), half or more of the estimated 4 million people living with chronic viral hepatitis in the U.S. do not know they are infected.

alt

DDW 2015: Hepatitis C Treatment Could Yield Large Economic Benefit

Interferon-free direct-acting antiviral therapy that cures most people with chronic hepatitis C could lead to major economic benefits by reducing lost worker productivity, according to an analysis presented at Digestive Disease Week 2015, now underway in Washington, DC.

alt

Daclatasvir, Asunaprevir, and Beclabuvir Shows High Cure Rates for People with Genotype 1 Hepatitis C

A twice-daily fixed-dose coformulation of daclatasvir, asunaprevir, and beclabuvir taken for 12 weeks cured 91% of genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C patients without liver cirrhosis, and even higher sustained response rates were obtained for people with cirrhosis when ribavirin was added, according to findings from the Phase 3 UNITY studies published in the May 5 issue of JAMA.

alt