Coinfection

IAS 2015: Fatty Liver May Contribute to Higher Risk of Death for HIV/HCV Coinfected People

About a quarter of HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfected people in a New York City cohort died over a 10-year follow-up period -- a "strikingly low" survival rate -- according to a poster presented at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention last month in Vancouver. Researchers saw trends toward an association between steatosis (fatty liver) and cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and overall survival.

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IAS 2015: Accessing Hepatitis C Treatment [VIDEO]

While new interferon-free direct-acting antiviral therapy can cure more than 90% of people with chronic hepatitis C -- including those with HIV/HCV coinfection -- access to treatment remains a major challenge, experts said at a media briefing on HIV and hepatitis coinfection at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention last month in Vancouver.

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IAS 2015: Effective New Treatment for HIV/HVC Coinfection [VIDEO]

Jürgen Rockstroh from the University of Bonn presented an overview of HIV/HCV coinfection during a press briefing at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention last week in Vancouver. Rockstroh covered topics including faster fibrosis progression and effective interferon-free therapy for coinfected people.

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IAS 2015: PrEP and the Risk of Hepatitis C Virus Infection [VIDEO]

 Are gay and bisexual men who take Truvada for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) at greater risk for sexually transmitted hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection? Experts discussed this issue and others at a media briefing on HIV and hepatitis coinfection at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention last month in Vancouver.

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IAS 2015: Access to Screening and Treatment Are Key Issues for Hepatitis B and C

The development of effective new interferon-free treatment makes it possible to cure more than 90% of people with chronic hepatitis C, including most people with HIV/HCV coinfection, researchers said at the 2nd International HIV/Viral Hepatitis Co-infection Meeting, preceding the 8th International AIDS Society Conference (IAS 2015) taking place this week in Vancouver. Looking at hepatitis B, antiviral therapy can effectively suppress the virus long-term, but most people are still not cured.

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IAS 2015: Daclatasvir + Sofosbuvir Cures Most Coinfected People in French Compassionate Use Study

 Interferon-free treatment using daclatasvir (Daklinza) and sofosbuvir (Sovaldi), with or without ribavirin, was well-tolerated and produced sustained virological response rates of 95%-100% for HIV/HCV coinfected people with advanced liver disease, according to a presentation at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2015) last month in Vancouver. These results, from a French program that provides new drugs to patients in need of treatment prior to regulatory approval, demonstrate that outcomes in the "real world" can be as good as those seen in clinical trials of the new drugs.

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IAS 2015: International AIDS Society Conference Starts this Weekend in Vancouver

The 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2015) starts this Sunday and runs July 19-22 in Vancouver. HIV prevention -- including treatment-as-prevention and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) -- will be a major focus of the meeting. Other topics will include antiretroviral drugs in development, expanding access to treatment and retention in care, and HIV/hepatitis coinfection. HIVandHepatitis.com will be on site covering the latest news.

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IAS 2015: Interferon-free Hepatitis Treatment Highly Effective for HIV/HCV Coinfected People

A trio of interferon-free regimens -- sofosbuvir/ledipasvir, AbbVie's 3D regimen, and grazoprevir/elbasvir -- were well-tolerated and cured more than 90% of HIV/HCV coinfected participants in 3 clinical trials, confirming that HIV-positive people can respond as well as HIV-negative people to modern hepatitis C treatment, according to a set of reports presented at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2015) last week in Vancouver.

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HIV/HCV Coinfected People with Moderate or Worse Fibrosis at Risk for Liver-Related Death

HIV-positive people coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) are more likely to die of liver-related causes if they have moderate or worse fibrosis or cirrhosis, and they should therefore be prioritized for the new antiviral treatment, according to a study described in the June 19 edition of AIDS.

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