Coinfection

IAS 2015: International AIDS Society Conference Starts this Weekend in Vancouver

The 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2015) starts this Sunday and runs July 19-22 in Vancouver. HIV prevention -- including treatment-as-prevention and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) -- will be a major focus of the meeting. Other topics will include antiretroviral drugs in development, expanding access to treatment and retention in care, and HIV/hepatitis coinfection. HIVandHepatitis.com will be on site covering the latest news.

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HIV/HCV Coinfected People with Moderate or Worse Fibrosis at Risk for Liver-Related Death

HIV-positive people coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) are more likely to die of liver-related causes if they have moderate or worse fibrosis or cirrhosis, and they should therefore be prioritized for the new antiviral treatment, according to a study described in the June 19 edition of AIDS.

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CROI 2015: HCV Sexual Transmission Linked to Anal Sex, Drug Use, Lower CD4 Count

In addition to the usual risk factors for hepatitis C virus (HCV) sexual transmission seen in most previous studies -- such as anal sex and having other sexually transmitted infections -- researchers in the Netherlands also saw an association with nasal and injection drug use and lower CD4 T-cell count, they reported in a poster presentation at the recent 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle.

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Coverage of the 2015 International AIDS Society Conference

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2015), July 19-22, in Vancouver, Canada.

Conference highlights include HIV treatment as prevention, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), new antiretroviral therapies, HIV cure research, hepatitis C and HIV/HCV coinfection, and global scale-up of prevention and treatment.

Full listing by topic

IAS 2015 website

7/22/15

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CROI 2015: End-Stage Liver Disease Among HIV+ People with Hepatitis B or C

People coinfected with HIV and hepatitis B or C virus are more likely to progress to end-stage liver disease, or liver failure, compared to those with HIV alone, and individuals triply infected with all 3 viruses are at greatest risk, according to study findings presented at the recent 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle.

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Injection Drug Use and Hepatitis C Coinfection Increase Risk of Death for People with HIV

HIV-positive people who inject drugs and those who are coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) have elevated mortality rates, according to a report from the ART Cohort Collaboration published in the July 1 Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. HIV/HCV coinfected drug injectors had a high risk of liver-related death, but those without HCV still had higher mortality due to various causes compared with non-injectors.

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CROI 2015: Re-infection Due to Ongoing Risk Is Probably the Cause of HCV Recurrence After SVR

Rates of hepatitis C virus (HCV) recurrence after successful therapy differ markedly between risk groups, according to the results of a meta-analysis presented at the recent 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle.

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Do Sex and HIV/HCV Coinfection Affect Response to Antiretroviral Treatment?

HIV-positive men and women coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) showed impaired CD4 T-cell restoration after starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) and had a 40% greater risk of death than people with HIV alone, though they were equally likely to achieve HIV viral suppression, according to study findings published in the May 18 advance edition of AIDS Patient Care and STDs.

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CROI 2015: Sustained Virological Response Represents a Long-term Cure for Hepatitis C

Almost all patients with hepatitis C virus alone or HIV/HCV coinfection who achieved sustained virological response (SVR) to treatment with sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) plus ribavirin or sofosbuvir/ledipasvir (Harvoni) still had undetectable HCV RNA up to 2.4 years later, confirming that SVR represents a cure, according to a poster presented at the recent 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle.

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