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Coverage of the 2014 International AIDS Conference

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 20th International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2014), July 20-25, in Melbourne, Australia.

Conference highlights include biomedical HIV prevention (PrEP and treatment-as-prevention), HIV cure research, interferon-free therapy for hepatitis C and HIV/HCV coinfection, access to treatment, and fighting stigma and criminalization of key affected populations.

Full listing by topic

AIDS 2014 website

7/25/14

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Inherited Low Cholesterol in Immune Cells Linked to Slower HIV Disease Progression

A genetic variation linked to lower levels of intracellular cholesterol is associated with reduced transmission of HIV between immune cells, which may contribute to slower evolution of disease in non-progressors, according to a report in the April 29, 2014, edition of the electronic journal mBio, published by the American Society for Microbiology.

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Low CD4 Count Despite Viral Suppression Linked to Higher Risk of Death

HIV positive people who have poor CD4 T-cell recovery on antiretroviral therapy (ART) had higher mortality than those with good immunological response, even if they reached undetectable viral load, according to a study published in the January 22 advance edition of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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CROI 2014: Cumulative Viral Load and HIV Disease Progression

Periodic low-level viral load appears to predict virological failure, but not progression to AIDS or death, and cumulative viral load over time may be a risk factor for HIV disease progression and mortality, according to studies presented at the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2014) this month in Boston.

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Severe Seroconversion Symptoms Predict Faster HIV Disease Progression

People who experience more severe symptoms or who have lower CD4 T-cell counts when they first become infected with HIV are more likely to experience faster disease progression later on, according to an international study described in the November 14, 2013, edition of PLoS Medicine.

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