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Gene Therapy Snips HIV Out of Infected Cells and Makes Uninfected Cells Resistant

For the first time, researchers have used a gene-editing technique related to one already used to produce cells resistant to HIV infection to target HIV-infected cells. They have managed to remove HIV genes completely from infected cells, as shown by reductions in the cells' overall rate of HIV production. In cells not already infected, the therapy has itself become part of their genome, producing cells that are resistant to infection for a prolonged period, according to a report in a recent edition of Nature Scientific Reports.

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CROI 2016: VRC01 Antibody Delays But Does Not Prevent HIV Rebound After ART Interruption

VRC01, a broadly neutralizing antibody targeting HIV's CD4 binding site, was able to modestly delay the return of viral replication following interruption of antiviral therapy (ART), according to a study presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2016)last month in Boston. VRC01 did not maintain viral suppression on its own, but it may play a role in combination therapy for HIV treatment or a functional cure.

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CROI 2016: Experimental TLR7 Agonist Suppresses HIV-Like Virus in Monkeys After ART Interruption

GS-9620, an investigational toll-like receptor or TLR7 agonist, led to immune activation in a study of macaque monkeys infected with an HIV-like virus, and 2 of the animals treated with multiple doses have maintained viral suppression for at least 3 months after stopping antiretroviral treatment, according to research presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2016) last week in Boston.

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CROI 2016: Dose-Finding Trials of Antibody-Based Drugs for HIV Prevention To Start Soon

The next generation of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), and even HIV treatment, may consist of antibodies that could be given as an intravenous infusion or an injection into muscle, according to 2 presenters at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2016)last month in Boston.

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Coverage of the 2016 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 2016 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic infections (CROI 2016), February 22-25, 2016, in Boston.

Conference highlights include PrEP and other HIV prevention innovations, new HIV treatment strategies, HIV cure research, the cascade of care, HIV-related conditions, and optimizing therapy for hepatitis C.

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage by topic

CROI website

2/26/16

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