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Study Shows Supervised Injection Facility Would Be Cost-Effective in San Francisco

Establishing a supervised consumption facility for people who inject drugs in San Francisco could reduce new HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, decrease overdose deaths, and save millions of dollars, according to a mathematical modeling study recently published online in the Journal of Drug Issues.

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HIVandHepatitis.com 2016 Conference Coverage

Article listings by topic for HIVandHepatitis.com conference coverage in 2016, including the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, EASL International Liver Congress, International AIDS Conference, and AASLD Liver Meeting.

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6. HIV Incidence Falls, But Not for Young Black Gay Men

New data show that while new HIV infections and diagnoses have decreased overall, they remain high for some population groups -- especially young black gay men in the U.S.

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Top 10 HIV and Hepatitis Stories of 2016

Simplification and optimization of antiretroviral therapy for HIV, wider use of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), a growing appreciation that people with undetectable viral load do not transmit HIV, and an expanded armamentarium of treatments for hepatitis C were among the top HIV and viral hepatitis headlines this year. Here's a look back at some of our biggest news from 2016.

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UCSF/amfAR HIV Cure Summit Reviews Progress in Cure-Related Research

Researchers at the amfAR Institute for HIV Cure Research at the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF) presented an update on their latest cure-related work at a World AIDS Day summit on December 1. This multidisciplinary effort aims to understand HIV reservoirs within the body and ultimately to control or eliminate the virus.alt

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Dolutegravir + Rilpivirine HIV Maintenance Regimen Looks Good in Phase 3 Studies

Switching to a 2-drug regimen of dolutegravir plus rilpivirine maintained viral suppression among people on successful 3- or 4-drug antiretroviral therapy (ART) in a pair of Phase 3 clinical trials, according to an announcement last week from ViiV Healthcare.

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IDWeek 2016: Comorbidities Are Common and Rising Among People with HIV

People living with HIV are increasingly experiencing a range of non-AIDS-related comorbidities as the population ages, including cardiovascular disease, kidney impairment, and bone loss leading to fractures, according to research presented at the recent IDWeek 2016 meeting in New Orleans.

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U.K.'s Largest Sexual Health Clinic Saw 40% Drop in New HIV Diagnoses in 2016

The clinic at 56 Dean Street in Soho, central London, the largest sexual health clinic in the U.K., saw an unprecedented 40% drop in new HIV diagnoses this year. Another clinic, the Mortimer Market Centre a mile away from Dean Street, has seen an even bigger 50% fall.

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UNAIDS Special Session Looks at HIV and Aging, New Report Examines Long-Term AIDS Survival

A UNAIDS Programme Coordinating Board meeting on December 8 addressed the challenges related to an aging population with HIV worldwide. In related news, activist Matt Sharp recently released a new report on long-term survivors living with HIV/AIDS.

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First Large Study of Long-Acting Injectable for HIV Prevention Now Underway

The National Institutes of Health and industry collaborators last week launched a large-scale clinical trial to test long-acting injectable cabotegravir for HIV prevention. Study HPTN 083 will compare cabotegravir injections administered every 8 weeks versus once-daily oral tenofovir/emtricitabine (Truvada) pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Results are expected in 2021.

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Advocates Call for More Research on Immune-Enhancing Therapies for People with HIV

HIV/AIDS activists recently issued a call for expanded research to accelerate the development of immune-enhancing therapies for HIV-positive immunological non-responders -- people who achieve viral suppression on antiretroviral therapy but do not see their CD4 T-cell count return to near-normal levels, and therefore remain at increased risk of illness and death.

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1. HIV Undetectable = Uninfectious

Evidence continues to accumulate showing that HIV-positive people on effective combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) with a consistently undetectable viral load have a very low -- perhaps as low as zero -- risk of transmitting the virus.

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Syringe Service Use Up, But a Third of People Who Inject Drugs Still Share Needles

Use of syringe exchange and distribution services has increased substantially over the past decade, and HIV diagnoses among people who inject drugs have fallen by nearly half, but just a quarter of drug injectors use only sterile needles and a third reported sharing a needle within the past year, according to the latest Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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2. Quicker, Simpler, and Better Antiretroviral Therapy

Modern antiretroviral therapy (ART) is highly effective and well-tolerated, but researchers continue to refine, streamline, and optimize treatment strategies. Studies presented this year show the benefits of starting ART as soon as possible after HIV diagnosis and suggest that fewer drugs taken less often may be effective for many people.

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Combination HIV Vaccine Efficacy Trial Launches in South Africa

A new HIV vaccine efficacy study -- the first in 7 years -- got underway this week in Cape Town, South Africa. The HVTN 702 trial will evaluate the safety and effectiveness of 2 experimental vaccines -- ALVAC-HIV and a gp120 protein subunit vaccine -- related to a combination that previously demonstrated modest efficacy in the RV144 trial in Thailand. The study aims to enroll more than 5400 sexually active adults and results are expected in late 2020.

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3. Renewed Focus on HIV Vaccines and Antibodies

Researchers intensified the search for novel types of therapies to prevent, treat, and potentially cure HIV, including immune-based strategies such as antibodies and vaccines.

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World AIDS Day: 18 Million Now on HIV Treatment but Many Still Lack Access

Thursday, December 1, is World AIDS Day, an opportunity to remember those lost to the epidemic and to focus on the continuing challenges of universal HIV prevention and treatment. According to a new report from UNAIDS, approximately 37 million people are living with HIV worldwide -- of whom more than 18 million are receiving antiretroviral therapy -- and there were about 2 million new infections in 2015.

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4. PrEP Use Widens, But Disparities Remain

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) was again a major HIV story in 2016. The latest figures from a pharmacy survey by Gilead Sciences showed that more than 79,000 people in the U.S. have started Truvada (tenofovir/emtricitabine) for HIV prevention, but the survey does not include all PrEP providers and most experts think this estimate is low.

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World AIDS Day: World Health Organization Urges Scale-Up of HIV Self-Testing

The World Health Organization (WHO) this week launched new guidelines encouraging countries to support self-testing in an effort to get more people to learn their HIV status -- the first step toward getting on effective treatment, achieving viral suppression, halting disease progression, and preventing onward HIV transmission. WHO estimates that only 60% of people with HIV are aware of their status, and says that self-testing can help countries meet the UN target of diagnosing 90% of all people with HIV by 2020.

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5. HIV Prevention for Women

Use of Truvada for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is highly effective and is now widely used among gay men, but biomedical HIV prevention for women has lagged behind.

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World AIDS Day: CDC Releases New HIV Diagnosis and Prevalence Data

In advance of World AIDS Day, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released its latest report on recently diagnosed HIV infections in the United States. The new HIV Surveillance Report, which covers data through 2015, shows that HIV diagnoses have decreased among both women and men, and among African Americans, Latinos, and whites, but have risen among young people age 25-29. As people with HIV live longer thanks to effective antiretroviral treatment, HIV prevalence has reached an all-time high of more than 955,000 people.

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