Coverage of IDWeek 2014

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of IDWeek 2014, October 8-12, in Philadelphia.

Conference highlights include the HIV cascade of care, experimental antiretroviral therapies, interferon-free hepatitis C treatment, and news about other infectious diseases including Ebola virus and enterovirus D68.

Full listing of coverage by topic

IDWeek 2014 website

10/17/14

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HCV Sexual Transmission: HIV Negative May Be at Risk, More Awareness and Testing Needed

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is known to be sexually transmitted among HIV positive men who have sex with men, but HIV negative men may be at risk as well, according to recent reports. Other recent studies have looked at awareness of HCV sexual transmission and screening practices, suggesting that improvement is needed in both areas.

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ICAAC 2014: IRIS and Risk of Early Death Among HIV+ People with Tuberculosis

People coinfected with HIV and tuberculosis (TB) who go onto develop immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) while on antiretroviral therapy (ART) have a pre-ART immunological profile that is easily distinguishable from those who are at risk of early mortality despite being treated for both HIV and TB, according to a presentation at the 54th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy this month in Washington, DC.

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ICAAC 2014: Anal HPV Infection and Dysplasia Common in HIV+ Women and Gay Men

Anal infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types was common among women with HIV in France, while a Spanish study found a low rate of pre-cancerous anal cell changes in HIV positive women compared with men who have sex with men, researchers reported at the recent 54th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy in Washington, DC.

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ICAAC 2014: Telaprevir and Boceprevir Have Limited Efficacy in Real-world Use

Hepatitis C treatment using the first-generation HCV protease inhibitors telaprevir (Incivek or Incivo) or boceprevir (Victrelis) cured only 71% of people with easier-to-treat HCV genotypes 1b, falling to 47% for those with genotype 1a, researchers reported at the 54th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy this month in Washington, DC.

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