AASLD 2016: Is Improved Treatment Reducing Liver Cancer Among People with Hepatitis B?

The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) appears to be decreasing and mortality improving among chronic hepatitis B patients treated with suppressive antiviral therapy, according to studies presented at the recent 2016 AASLD Liver Meeting in Boston. However, liver cancer remains a major indication for liver transplants and has a negative effect on survival of people with hepatitis B.

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AASLD 2016: Lonafarnib Lowers Hepatitis Delta Levels with Acceptable Side Effects

The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) assembly inhibitor lonafarnib reduces HDV viral load and can be safely boosted with ritonavir to allow for higher and more effective doses with acceptable gastrointestinal side effects, according to study results presented at the recent AASLD Liver Meeting in Boston.

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AASLD 2016: Curing Hepatitis C Reduces Liver-Related Complications and Death

People with hepatitis C who achieve sustained virological response to treatment had lower liver-related morbidity and mortality rates compared to patients who were not successfully treated, according to research presented at the recent AASLD Liver Meeting.

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AASLD 2016: Is DAA Treatment for Hepatitis C Reducing the Need for Liver Transplants?

Patients successfully treated for hepatitis are less likely to need liver transplants and less likely to die while on a transplant waiting list, according to studies presented at the recent AASLD Liver Meeting. A related analysis looked at the optimal timing of treatment for people awaiting transplants in order to avoid "MELD purgatory."

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AASLD 2016: Liver Cirrhosis and Decompensation on the Rise Among People with Hepatitis C

Complications of advanced liver disease including cirrhosis and hepatic decompensation have risen over the past decade among people with chronic hepatitis C, according to study findings presented at the AASLD Liver Meeting in November. However, in recent years the increase has slowed, especially among those at highest risk -- black patients and people age 60 and over.

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