ICAAC 2015: No Transmission of Integrase Inhibitor-Resistant HIV Seen in California Patients

Not one case of transmission of HIV that is resistant to any of the integrase inhibitor drugs has been seen among newly diagnosed patients in a database of resistance tests in California, according to a presentation at the 55th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC)last month in San Diego.

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Coverage of 2015 Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy

HIVandHepatitis.com coverage of the 55th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC), San Diego, September 17-21, 2015.

Highlights of this year's conference include experimental antiretroviral drugs and treatment strategies, HIV prevention, and comorbidities among people with HIV and HIV/HCV coinfection.

Full listing by topic

ICAAC website

10/6/15

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ICAAC 2015: New Antiretrovirals and HIV Treatment Strategies

Researchers presented findings from several HIV studies at the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) last week in San Diego, including an overview of the START treatment initiation study, an all-women antiretroviral therapy trial, and studies of a better tolerated version of tenofovir (tenofovir alafenamide or TAF) and the experimental integrase inhibitor cabotegravir.

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ICAAC 2015: Comorbidities and Mortality Among HIV-Positive and HIV/HCV Coinfected People

While illness and death due to opportunistic illnesses has declined, people living with HIV remain prone to comorbidities that contribute to hospitalization and reduced survival, according to presentations at the 55th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) last weekin San Diego. Mortality is higher among HIV-positive people coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), and is associated with liver fibrosis progression, offering further evidence supporting prompt hepatitis C treatment.

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ICAAC 2015: Combination Vaginal Ring May Be Able to Prevent Both HIV and Herpes

An experimental silicone vaginal ring with separate compartments may be able to deliver both tenofovir for prevention of HIV infection and acyclovir for prevention of genital herpes and potentially other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), according to a report at the 55th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC) last weekin San Diego.

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