19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012)

March 5-8, 2012, Seattle

CROI 2012: Elevated Blood Pressure Linked to Heart Attack Risk in HIV+ People

HIV positive people with elevated blood pressure are at higher risk for myocardial infarction, or heart attack, even if they do not meet the definition for high blood pressure, researchers reported at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012) this month in Seattle.alt

Read more:

CROI 2012: Community-wide Isoniazid Prevention Did Not Improve TB Control in South African Mines

Giving a 6- to 9-month course of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) at a "community-wide level" -- to everyone working at randomly selected South African gold mines -- had no effect on tuberculosis (TB) incidence, TB prevalence, or all-cause mortality in the population, when compared to a cluster of gold mines randomized to standard TB program management, according to the Thibela TB study, the largest IPT intervention study ever to be conducted.alt

Read more:

CROI 2012: Infants with HIV Who Receive Early ART Can Safely Stop Treatment

HIV-infected infants who start antiretroviral therapy (ART) immediately after birth can interrupt treatment after 1-2 years and still do better than babies who delayed ART initiation until they developed symptoms, researchers reported at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012) this month in Seattle.alt

Read more:

CROI 2012: HIV Positive People Need Ribavirin for Optimal Treatment of Acute Hepatitis C

HIV positive people acutely infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes 2 or 3 benefit from receiving weight-based ribavirin in addition to pegylated interferon, according to study findings presented at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012) this month in Seattle.alt

Read more:

CROI 2012: Metformin, Statins, and ACE Inhibitors May Reduce Cardiovascular Risk of People with HIV

The diabetes drug metformin can help stall progression of calcium build-up in the arteries of HIV positive people with metabolic abnormalities, potentially reducing their risk of cardiovascular events, researchers reported this month at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012) in Seattle. Other studies found that statin drugs showed a trend toward lowering the risk of non-AIDS events and death, and an ACE inhibitor reduced blood pressure and certain inflammation biomarkers.

Read more: