19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012)

March 5-8, 2012, Seattle

CROI 2012: HIV Brain Impairment: Who Gets It, and Why?

A number of papers at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012) last week in Seattle presented advances in research on HIV-related brain impairment and neurocognitive problems.

A couple of problems have dogged research into HIV-related brain impairment. One is how to differentiate between degrees of severity. Psychological tests can detect barely noticeable slowing of performance but the high prevalence of this asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment (ANI) overestimates the proportion of people with HIV who have real difficulty with working or daily life. We also do not know to what extent ANI is a predictor of the development of significant impairment, because some people improve, especially with antiretroviral treatment (ART).

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CROI 2012: Uncontrolled HIV Linked to Faster Lung Function Decline

People with detectable HIV viral load and advanced immune deficiency are likely to experience greater decreases in lung function over time, with high viral load linked to more impairment than smoking, according to a study presented last week at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012) last week in Seattle.alt

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CROI 2012: Electrocautery Superior to Imiquimod or 5-Fluorouracil for Treatment of Anal Neoplasia

Electrocautery was shown to be more effective and tolerable than topical imiquimod or 5-fluorouracil as a treatment for anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) in HIV positive men who have sex with men (MSM), researchers reported in a late-breaker presentation at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012) last week in Seattle.alt

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CROI 2012: Studies Look at Interactions Between New Hepatitis C Drugs and HIV Antiretrovirals

Drug-drug interactions between direct-acting antiviral agents for hepatitis C and some altantiretroviral medications used to treat HIV are common, but are often modest and can be managed with dose adjustments when treating people with HIV/HCV coinfection, researchers reported at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012) last week in Seattle.

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CROI 2012: 4-in-1 Elvitegravir Quad Pill Matches Efavirenz and Atazanavir Combos

The Quad single-tablet regimen, an all-in-one pill containing the experimental integrase inhibitor elvitegravir plus 2 other antiretroviral drugs and a novel boosting agent, was as effective as the widely used Atripla combination but with fewer neuropsychiatric side-effects, researchers reported at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012) this week in Seattle. In a companion study the Quad also matched boosted atazanavir (Reyataz).alt

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