19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012)

March 5-8, 2012, Seattle

CROI 2012: ART Liver Toxicity is Lower with Modern Regimens, but Still a Risk for HIV/HCV Coinfected

Liver toxicity related to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has become less common in recent years thanks to development of better tolerated drugs and improved understanding of how to use them. But HIV positive people coinfected with hepatitis C remain at higher risk, researchers reported at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012) this month in Seattle.

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CROI 2012: HIV Treatment May Reduce Mother-to-Child Hepatitis C Transmission

Effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV and maintaining a high CD4 T-cell count may decrease the risk of hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission from HIV/HCV coinfected mothers to their babies, according to study findings presented at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012) this month in Seattle.alt

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CROI 2012: Zinc Finger HIV Gene Therapy Moves Ahead

Further good news was presented at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012) this month in Seattle regarding SB-728-T, the Sangamo zinc finger nuclease HIV gene therapy currently in Phase 2 development.

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CROI 2012: San Francisco Early HIV Treatment Policy Linked to Lower Viral Load, Higher CD4 Count

San Francisco's policy of offering antiretroviral therapy (ART) to everyone who tests positive for HIV regardless of CD4 T-cell count has resulted in higher average CD4 counts at the time of treatment initiation and faster suppression of HIV viral load, researchers reported at the at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012) this month in Seattle.alt

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CROI 2012: Detectable HIV Raises Risk of Incomplete Hepatitis B Suppression

HIV/HBV coinfected people with detectable HIV viral load and higher baseline HBV viral load were less likely to completely suppress hepatitis B after a year on tenofovir (Viread), but CD4 cell count did not show an effect, researchers reported at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2012) this month in Seattle.alt

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