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HCV Disease Progression

EASL 2015: Another Study Confirms Detrimental Effects of Delaying Hepatitis C Treatment

Deferring antiviral therapy for hepatitis C until a person progresses to advanced liver disease has clear drawbacks including lower treatment effectiveness and an increased risk of clinical events and death, according to a study of U.S. veterans presented at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) 50th International Liver Congress last week in Vienna.

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EASL 2015: Advanced Liver Damage Is Common Among People with Undiagnosed Hepatitis C

Around 1 in 5 people with hepatitis C in the U.S. who do not know of their infection may already have advanced liver damage and be in urgent need of treatment, according to a cross-sectional survey of participants in the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES) presented by Prowpanga Udompap at the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) 50th International Liver Congress last week in Vienna.

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Liver Cirrhosis Is More Common in U.S. than Previously Believed

New estimates indicate that more than 600,000 people in the U.S. have liver cirrhosis -- about 200,000 more than previously thought -- according to a study published online in the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology. Cirrhosis was associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, heavy alcohol use, and diabetes.

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CROI 2015: Liver Disease Progression Is Common Among Baby Boomers with Hepatitis C

The burden of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is high in the U.S., with nearly half of HCV-infected individuals born between 1945 and 1965 having severe fibrosis or cirrhosis and therefore being at high priority for treatment, according to a report presented at the 2015 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) last week in Seattle.

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10. Hepatitis C Cures for HIV/HCV Coinfected and Advanced Liver Disease

New interferon-free direct-acting antiviral regimens have high cure rates for chronic hepatitis C patients who were previously considered "difficult to treat," including HIV/HCV coinfected people and patients with liver cirrhosis, decompensated liver disease, and liver transplant recipients. New treatment can now cure a majority of people even with multiple negative predictive factors.

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