International AIDS Society Conference

July 17-20, 2011 - Rome, Italy

Back IAS 2011

IAS 2011: HIV Prevention -- A Women's Revolution [VIDEO]

The 6th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2011) held last week in Rome heralded remarkable data showing that early HIV treatment and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) can dramatically reduce the risk of HIV transmission.

But biomedical prevention methods will only work if people have access to them, and many women worldwide do not have access due to lack of economic resources or the right of self-determination.alt

Read more:

IAS 2011: New NNRTI Lersivirine Looks Good in Phase 2 Study

Lersivirine, an investigational non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), lowered HIV viral load about as well as efavirenz (Sustiva) for people starting antiretroviral therapy for the first time, researchers reported at the 6th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2011) this week in Rome. alt

Read more:

HIV Drug Development News from IAS 2011 [VIDEO]

Cal Cohen from the Community Research Institute of New England summarizes reports about experimental antiretroviral agents -- and new strategies for using existing drugs -- presented at the 6th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention this week in Rome. alt

Read more:

IAS 2011: Cognitive Impairment is Common, but ART Reduces Risk

Cognitive impairment remains common among people with HIV and is linked to more severe immune deficiency and absence of treatment, researchers reported at the International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2011) this week in Rome. But drugs that penetrate the central nervous system do not appear to improve overall outcomes. alt

Read more:

IAS 2011: Randomized Trial Supports Earlier Treatment

The large HPTN 052 trial, best known for showing that early antiretroviral treatment prevents HIV transmission, also found virological, immunological, and clinical benefit to starting HIV treatment sooner.

Read more: