alt51st Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC)

September 17-20, 2011, Chicago

ICAAC 2011: Omitting Inactive NRTIs from Salvage Regimen Can Maintain Viral Suppression

Simplifying therapy by discontinuing nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) that no longer demonstrate activity against HIV due to resistance appears to be a safe strategy that does not compromise virological control, according to a study presented at the 51st Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2011) this month in Chicago.alt

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ICAAC 2011: Maraviroc May Reduce Liver Fibrosis in HIV/HCV Coinfected People

Adding the CCR5 blocker maraviroc (Selzentry) to an antiretroviral regimen reduced liver stiffness, an indicator of fibrosis, according to a study presented at the 51st Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2011) this week in Chicago.

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ICAAC 2011: Cobicistat Matches Ritonavir as Booster, Studies Clarify Effects on Kidney Function

The experimental pharmacoenhancing agent cobicistat continues to work as well as ritonavir for boosting other antiretroviral drugs, according to findings published in the September 24, 2011, issue of AIDS.

In addition, 2 studies presented this week at the 51st Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2011) shed further light on cobicistat's impact on the kidneys, indicating that it reduces estimated but not actual glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by altering activity in the proximal renal tubules.

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ICAAC 2011: Lopinavir/ritonavir Reduces Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission during Supplemental Breastfeeding

HIV positive mothers who use a lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra or Alluvia) antiretroviral regimen can reduce the risk of transmitting the virus to their infants during extended supplemental breastfeeding, supporting recent World Health organization (WHO) guidelines.alt

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ICAAC 2011: Zinc Finger Gene Therapy Boosts CD4 Cells, May Lower HIV Viral Load

HIV positive people who had their CD4 T-cells altered to delete the CCR5 coreceptor continue to experience sustained CD4 cell increases, and a subset of participants with high levels of modified cells maintained lower viral load during an investigational treatment interruption, researchers reported at the 51st Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2011).alt

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