18th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2011)

February 27-March 2, 2011, Boston

Back CROI 2011

Once-daily Raltegravir Found Less Effective than Twice-Daily Dosing

In treatment-naive HIV patients the integrase inhibitor raltegravir (Isentress) taken once-daily was inferior to twice-daily dosing, according to findings from the QDMRK study presented this week at the 18th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2011) in Boston. The difference in efficacy was especially pronounced among people with low baseline viral load.

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CROI 2011: Researchers Report Further Findings from iPrEx PrEP Trial

Investigators presented further details of findings from the ground-breaking iPrEx trial this week at the 18th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2011) in Boston. With longer follow-up, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) using tenofovir/emtricitabine (Truvada) continued to have a protective effect against HIV acquisition, but signs of mild bone loss raise potential concerns about safety.

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CROI 2011: Experimental Integrase Inhibitor Dolutegravir Looks Promising for People with Resistant HIV

The second-generation integrase inhibitor dolutegravir (formerly known as S/GSK1349572 or simply GSK572) demonstrated potent activity with a favorable tolerability profile for HIV patients with highly resistant virus in the second cohort of the VIKING study, researchers reported at the 18th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2011) this month in Boston. Results indicate that the drug works better when taken twice rather than once daily.

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CROI 2011: New Tenofovir Pro-drug GS-7340 Looks Good in Early Study

A new pro-drug formulation of tenofovir (currently marketed as Viread, also in the Truvada and Atripla combination pills) produces a higher drug concentration in lymphoid tissues that harbor HIV, offering the prospect of lower doses and new fixed-dose formulations, according to a presentation last week at the 18th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2011) in Boston. Further studies are needed to determine whether higher tenofovir concentrations will lead to worse bone or kidney toxicity. alt

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CROI 2011: HCV Protease Inhibitor Boceprevir Improves Response for Treatment-Naive and Non-responders

Merck's investigational hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitor boceprevir improved sustained response rates when combined with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin in both previously untreated patients and those who were non-responders or relapsers after prior therapy, according to 2 Phase 3 studies presented at the 18th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2011) this month in Boston. alt

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