Back HIV/AIDS Epidemiology

HIV/AIDS Epidemiology & Mortality

New Analysis Estimates Future Course of U.S. HIV Epidemic

As described in the July 14, 2010 advance online edition of the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have new estimates of future HIV incidence (new cases), prevalence (total cases), and infections averted under a variety of scenarios including stepped-up prevention interventions. They found that HIV prevalence will likely increase over time unless greater attention is devoted to preventing new infections.

Read more:

HIV/HCV Coinfection, but Not HIV Alone, Raises Risk of Liver-related Death

HIV positive people coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) had an elevated mortality rate compared with the general population in Spain, but this was not the case for individuals with HIV alone, according to a study presented at the XVIII International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2010) last month in Vienna.

Read more:

CDC Releases 2008 Surveillance Report Showing Higher Number of People Living with HIV, but Stable Rate of New Infections

On June 14, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released its latest HIV Surveillance Report, presenting data for cases of HIV infection and AIDS in 2008 (as reported to CDC through June 2009). The CDC estimates that there are more than 1 million people now living with HIV in the U.S. The yearly number of HIV diagnoses rose between 2005 and 2008, in part due to increased testing, but the estimated number of actual new infections, as well as the diagnosis rate relative to the total population, have remained stable in recent years

alt

Read more:

AIDS 2010: CDC Study Reveals High HIV Infection Rates Linked to Poverty More than Race

Local HIV/AIDS epidemics in some large U.S. cities have reached the status of "generalized epidemic," meaning there is significant HIV transmission outside defined risk groups such as gay/bisexual men and injection drug users, researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported at the XVIII International AIDS Conference this week in Vienna. They also found that poverty, rather than race/ethnicity per se, is the major demographic factor influencing HIV prevalence among heterosexuals in economically disadvantaged urban areas.

alt

Read more:

Math Model Predicts Wave of Drug Resistant HIV in San Francisco, but Vancouver Study Find 'Drastic Decrease' in Resistance

Is HIV drug resistance becoming more common? Two recent studies suggest opposite answers. A mathematical model by University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers found that resistant HIV strains are common in San Francisco, and 60% of them could potentially cause self-sustaining epidemics. Local public health officials, however, said drug resistance is not new or cause for extraordinary concern. And a study looking at actual trends in drug resistance among participants in the British Columbia Drug Treatment Program found that the incidence of new resistance fell more than 12-fold between 1997 and 2008.

Read more: