Back HIV-Related Conditions Cardiovascular

Cardiovascular Disease

HIV Linked to Increased Heart Failure Risk

People with HIV, especially those with detectable viral load, were found to be at increased risk of heart failure in a study of U.S. veterans.

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More Evidence Abacavir Does Not Raise Heart Attack Risk

A large cohort study found no increased risk of myocardial infarction in people taking abacavir.

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CROI 2011: FDA Safety Review Does Not Find Abacavir-Heart Attack Link

A meta-analysis by researchers from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) adds to the ongoing debate about the association between the NRTI abacavir (Zaigen, also in the Epzicom and Trizivir coformulations) and increased risk of myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular events. The new review of 26 randomized clinical trials, presented as a poster at the 18th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2011) this week in Boston, did not reveal a significant link between abacavir and heart attacks.

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CROI 2011: Studies Shed Further Light on Cardiovascular Disease among People with HIV


HIV positive people are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease overall, compared with HIV negative individuals, according to findings from Kaiser Permanente presented this month at the 18th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI 2011). Other studies found that HIV positive people on ART with well-preserved immune function were not at greater risk, however, and that abacavir (Ziagen) was not linked to heart attacks.

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Can Statins Reduce Inflammation in People with HIV?

Statin medications such as atorvastatin (Lipitor), usually used to lower blood cholesterol, may also reduce immune activation in HIV positive people, according to a small study described in the March 15, 2011, Journal of Infectious Diseases. Reducing immune activation and inflammation may decrease the risk of chronic non-AIDS conditions such as cardiovascular disease, but a much larger study will be required to demonstrate clinical benefits.

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